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Google Chrome suppresses”demanding ads”

Better Ads Standards will be updated in a web browser in August.

Earlier this year, Google shocked the online advertising ad tech world by announcing that it would not support third-party cookies in its dominant Chrome web browser starting in 2022, which would disable the basic advertising targeting mechanisms.

Policy update news has caused concern across the entire ecosystem of advertising technology, given that Google Chrome contains for more than half of all installed web browsers, according to W3C statistics.

 

Meanwhile, the Chrome team announced that starting in August, it will begin to hide ads that it considers “resource-intensive” as a subtle reminder of who holds the reins of advertising technology.

 

“Recently, we found that a small portion of advertising consumes a disproportionately large share of the device’s resources, such as battery and network data, and the user does not know about this,” Chrome Product Manager Marshal Vale writes in his speech. Blog post announcing the update.

 

 

Therefore, Google Chrome will violate or “unload” violating the ad units of the publisher’s webpage as soon as they reach the limits allocated by the web browser.

 

Thresholds – up to 4 MB of network data, 15 seconds of CPU usage for any 30-second interval, or 60 seconds of total CPU usage in accordance with the new terms of use (see Image below).

“Although today only 0.3% of ads exceeds this threshold, they account for 27% of the network data used by ads and 28% of all ad processor use,” Weil wrote on his blog.

 

This step builds on the actions taken by the Google Chrome team earlier this year to reduce the number of devastating video ads.

 

 The study identified non-skipping pre-rolls, mid-rolls, and text ads overlaid on top of organic content as offensive elements.

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